11 Cheapest Places to Live in Canada

11 Cheapest Places to Live in Canada

11 Cheapest Places to Live in Canada.
Deciding on a place to live can be a difficult choice, particularly if finances are an important
factor.
Before deciding where to settle down, it often pays to consider cost of living as well as
the different opportunities that certain locations can offer.
Climate, population, job access, ease of transportation, culture and amenities may be among your considerations
as well.
Fortunately, there are some great low priced options in Canada which we found to offer
a lot of value for your investment.
With that in mind, here are 11 of the cheapest places to live in Canada.
1: Hamilton.
Hamilton is a city in the province of Ontario.
It has a relatively low cost of living, sitting at more than 39% cheaper than NYC.
A large city, Hamilton has over 500,000 residents, and the population density is 1,245 people
per square mile.
Some of the largest industries in Hamilton are business and manufacturing, and a relatively
large proportion of the population works in sales related careers.
Over 20% of Hamilton residents immigrated to Canada, with almost half of those people
being from Italy.
There are multiple colleges in the city, and there are many public and private schools
for younger children.
The city is also home to several attractions, such as a botanical garden, a major arts center,
art galleries, and museums, among others.
2: Kitchener.
Kitchener, a city with over 233,000 residents, sits in southern Ontario, Canada.
The city is relatively affordable, having a cost of living index of 62.89 compared to
New York City’s base of 100.
The population density is much higher in Kitchener than in nearby towns, at just over 1,600 people
per square mile.
The median age of residents is 37.1 years old.
Much of Kitchener’s industry lies in the manufacturing business, and therefore many
people work in the more industrial areas.
In recent years, work has been done in the downtown area to improve livability for residents,
such as widening streets and introducing elements to help the environment, including planter
beds capable of filtering water.
Kitchener has many schools available for children, has a library and shopping malls, and is also
near a skiing resort.
3: Guelph.
Guelph is a city in Ontario with a population of almost 132,000 residents.
Its cost of living index is 34.84% less than NYC.
You can rent a one-bedroom apartment for under 900 Canadian dollars per month in the city,
and you can buy a public transportation pass for $75 per month as well.
The median income in Guelph is actually higher than Ontario’s overall median income, which
can help cover the necessary expenses of city life.
Manufacturing is a major area of industry here, and a large segment of the population
works in sales or service occupations.
The marital statuses of residents are similar to that of Ontario overall, with just under
58% over adult residents being married or having a common-law partner, and just over
42% unmarried.
Guelph has natural attractions along its rivers, as well as several festivals throughout the
year.
4: Surrey.
Surrey, located in British Columbia, is a city with a population of over 500,000.
It is very densely populated, and has seen population increases in recent years.
The cost of living index against base 100 of New York is 66.82.
Business is one of the major industries in Surrey, and many residents have jobs in the
sales and service fields, as well as in business and trade.
There are many schools for children to attend and there are 3 universities, although the
majority of residents do not have a post-secondary degree themselves.
Surrey is home to several cultural attractions, including museums, festivals, and a large
Canada Day event.
5: Moncton.
Moncton is a transportation hub city in New Brunswick, Canada.
The city’s population sits just under 72,000 residents spread out over an area of 54.51
square miles.
The cost of living index compared to NYC’s 100 is at an affordable 67.13.
The unemployment rate in Moncton is 6.2%, which is lower than New Brunswick’s overall
10% rate.
The median income is also higher than that of the province in general.
The most popular languages among residents are English and French.
In terms of attractions, the city is home to multiple urban parks as well as theatres
and galleries.
There are also tourist locations including Magnetic Hill, whose topography casts an optical
illusion.
There are public and private schools, that use both the French and English languages
to teach, available for residents.
6: Kelowna.
In southern British Columbia sits Kelowna, a city of 127,380 residents over an area of
81.78 square miles.
The median age of the people living here is 43 years old.
The cost of living in this city is 32.72% cheaper than NYC, meaning that things are
pretty affordable.
The median income in Kelowna is slightly above that of British Columbia overall, at 25,134
Canadian dollars.
Additionally, the unemployment rate is relatively low, at 4.8%.
Some of the most common occupations are those in the fields of sales and service, business,
and trade.
Kelowna is a large tourist city, drawing visitors especially towards its downtown district,
which is home to parks, beaches, restaurants, shops, and more.
Unfortunately, this city does have a high crime rate, but that is mostly due to property
crimes rather than violent ones.
The most common religious group among residents is Protestants, although large segments of
the population are either Catholic or have no religious affiliation, and smaller segments
practice other faiths.
7: Quebec City.
Quebec City, the capital of the Quebec province, is a city with over 545,000 residents.
There are over 3,600,000 private houses in the city, and the population density is higher
than that of the overall province.
The cost of living index compared to New York’s 100 is 67.64.
Almost 95% of residents have grown up speaking French, although approximately 1/3 are bilingual
with French and English.
As with many other affordable areas in Canada, common occupations include sales and service
jobs, business, and trade.
The average resident age in Quebec City is 39.5.
Unfortunately, the median income in the city is lower than the national average.
However, there are several attractions of living here, including parks, European style
architecture, festivals, and sports teams, among others.
8: Ottawa.
Ottawa, with a population of over 900,000 residents, is the capital city of Canada and
is located in Ontario.
The median income in the city is higher than the average for the province, and the unemployment
rate is lower.
The cost of living in Ottawa is 31.66% cheaper than in New York City, so you can get the
feel of big city living without a huge price tag.
Sales and service jobs, as well as jobs in the business field, are among the most common
for residents.
People living in Ottawa are generally well educated, and there are several educational
and research institutions in the city.
Additionally, quality of life has been ranked highly in Ottawa.
Some of the primary attractions in the city include museums, government buildings, and
parks.
There are also cultural centers and festivals, including the largest festival in Canada,
Winterlude.
9: Kingston.
Kingston, near Lake Ontario, is a city of over 123,000 people.
The cost of living here, compared to New York City’s base 100, is 68.66.
The median income in this city is slightly lower than that of Ontario overall.
Kingston’s economy is based around establishments including health care, education, and government,
as well as tourism.
As such, it is centered around the people themselves.
A little over half of the residents live with their spouse or common-law partner, and 67%
of families in Kingston include married couples.
The city has been highly ranked in terms of being a great place for young professionals
to live.
Additionally, there are attractions for people of all ages, including museums, natural scenery,
and galleries.
The residents of Kingston are well-educated, as the per capita rate for holding a PhD is
higher here than in any other Canadian city.
10: Montreal.
Montreal is a city in the Quebec province of Canada.
It has a population of over 1,700,000 people spread out over an area of 166.6 square miles.
The cost of living here is 30.66% lower than in NYC, which means that residents can save
a lot of money while still having the advantages of a big city life.
The economy in Montreal is among Canada’s largest, and business services play a large
role in industry.
The median age of residents is 38.6, which is slightly lower than the Quebec province’s
median of 41.9 years old.
There are many parks throughout the city, as well as music venues and nightlife.
Additionally, Montreal is well-connected in terms of transportation, and is home to several
airports.
Though French tends to be the dominant language here, the majority of residents also speak
English.
11: Toronto.
Toronto, which is located in the province of Ontario, is Canada’s largest city, with
a population of over 2,700,000 residents.
Despite being such a big city, Toronto is still affordable, with a cost of living that
is 30.3% cheaper than New York.
As recent years have gone by, employment rates in the city have increased.
The majority of jobs in Toronto are service-based.
The median age of city residents is 39.2, which is slightly lower than Ontario’s overall
median of 40.4.
Since Toronto is such a large city, it is home to many attractions, including museums,
theatres, amusement parks, and government buildings, as well as many universities.
English is the primary language of city residents, although other languages, including French,
are spoken by segments of the population.
Toronto is also a city full of culture, due in part to its place in the film industry
and its festivals and performance productions.